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Walking in Tuscany
             
 
I T Vetulonia


album Surroundings
       
   


Vetulonia



   
   

Of Villanovan origin (8th century B.C.), Vetulonia was one of the richest and most powerful metropolises in Etruria, as can be deduced from the remains of the boundary wall - still visible in part between two mediaeval towers (Mura dell'Arce) - as well as by the extraordinary extent and richness of its necropolises (Poggio alla Guardia, Poggio alle Birbe, Poggio al Bello, Colle Baroncio, Poggio Valli, Le Dupiane, Poggio Pelliccia). Particularly worth seeing are the tombs known as Pietrera and Diavolino II.
Before entering the mediaeval village, where the new archaeological Museum is housed, the so-called "city" Excavations offer interesting finds of the 2nd-1st century B.C., whilst remains of buildings and mosaics that have surfaced in the area of "Le Banditelle" suggest the forum of Roman Veulonia was situated there.

Tumulo della Pietrera

 

PietreraVestibule

Pietrera Vestibule, Entrance to the Pietrera Tomb, Tholos tomb, Etruscan civilisation, 7th century BCE.[3]

 

 
 
 
In 1892, Isidoro Falchi found some statues inside the tomb of the Pietrera. As they date back to the second half of the seventh century B.C, they constitute one of the first examples of monumental sculpture known in Etruria.

The specimens found, about twenty or so, are only fragments: the figures which have been best preserved are a female head and bust with her arms folded across her chest, and are now part of the collection of the Museo Archeologico (Archaeological Museum) of Florence.

In spite of their fragmentary state, we can affirm that these sculptures in sandstone, almost life-sized, depict eight standing characters, men and women represented with costly clothing and with their arms folded across their chests in the customary ritual of mourning, to immortalize the ritual of the funerary mourning around the tomb.

The rudimentary treatment of the posterior part of the statues leads us to believe that they were backed by a wall and therefore designed to be viewed only from the front: they cannot, therefore, be defined as free-standing statues.

The rigidity of the moulding is contrasted by a chiselled working of the details: locks of hair which fall in curls, necklaces, a belt in relief which displays a decoration with two winged animals. This attention to detail reveals an influence of the minor arts: the statues testify the habit of repeating oriental models in the minor arts, already found on ivories and ceramics from the seventh century BCE.
  PietreraDome
Exterior view of the dome of the tomb of the Quarry (tumulo della Pietrera) Vetulonia[3] Veduta esterna della cupola della tomba della Cava (tumulo della Pietrera) Vetulonia
 
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MaquetteTDPietrera

Model of tumulo della Pietrera Vetulonia in the museum museum Isidoro Falchi

Modello di Tumulo della Pietrera Vetulonia nel museo museum Isidoro Falchi

 

Museo Civico Archeologico di Vetulonia "Isidoro Falchi"

Isidoro Falchi, the Archaeological Museum of Vetulonia, just a few minutes’ drive from Punta Ala, describes the area's history through the archaeological finds uncovered in Vetulonia and the surrounding areas.
Inaugurated in 2000, the museum was named after Isidoro Falchi, the doctor and amateur archaeologist who identified the remains of the ancient city of Vetulonia within the archaeological ruins of Colonna di Buriano in the late nineteenth century.
The museum comprises seven rooms, and tells the story of a centre that was inhabited between the tenth and first century BC, and was one of the main cities in the Etruscan "league of twelve cities".
In addition to its permanent collection, the museum hosts several exhibitions events in collaboration with Tuscany’s Archaeological Department, such as an exhibition of burial artefacts and objects of particular historical and archaeological interest.

Museo Civico Archeologico di Vetulonia "Isidoro Falchi"
Piazza Vetulonia, 1
58040 Vetulonia (GR) - Italy
Tel. +39 0564 948058
www.museidimaremma.it



   
   
 
   
         
note

[1] Tratto da "Parco degli Etruschi |www.parcodeglietruschi.it
[2]
The Sculptural Cycle of the tomb of Pietrera from Vetulonia (Grosseto) | www.ancientetruscan.blogspot.it
[3] This illustration was made by louis-garden, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
   
         
         


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